The Art of Jiu Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

The Art of Jiu Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu was formed from Kodokan judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught by a number of individuals including Takeo Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda and Soshihiro Satake. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu eventually came to be its own art through the experiments, practices, and adaptation of judo through Carlos and Helio Gracie (who passed their knowledge on to their extended family) as well as other instructors who were students of Maeda, such as Luiz Franca.

A major difference between Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and its parent martial art of Judo, and the more traditional martial arts such as karate, is that BJJ is often argued to be a formless art. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is absent of the katas and standardized grading criteria which are so commonly found in what are known as the traditional martial arts. Instead, BJJ is a martial art open to interpretation; such that new techniques and ways of movement, attack, defense, and thinking are being developed daily by those practicing it. Subsequently, the promotion of athletes/fighters through the ranks is highly subjective and can differ greatly from one academy to another.

BJJ promotes the concept that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend against a bigger, stronger, heavier assailant by using proper technique, leverage, and most notably, taking the fight to the ground, and then applying joint-locks and chokeholds to defeat the opponent. BJJ training can be used for sport grappling tournaments (gi and no-gi) and mixed martial arts (MMA) competition or self-defense. Sparring (commonly referred to as rolling) and live drilling play a major role in training, and a premium is placed on performance, especially in competition, in relation to progress and ascension through its ranking system.  Since its inception in 1882, its parent art of judo was separated from older systems of Japanese Jiu Jitsu by an important difference that was passed on to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: it is not solely a martial art,but it is also a sport; a method for promoting physical fitness and building character in young people; and, ultimately, a way (Do) of life.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu was formed from Kodokan judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught by a number of individuals including Takeo Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda and Soshihiro Satake. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu eventually came to be its own art through the experiments, practices, and adaptation of judo through Carlos and Helio Gracie (who passed their knowledge on to their extended family) as well as other instructors who were students of Maeda, such as Luiz Franca.

A major difference between Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and its parent martial art of Judo, and the more traditional martial arts such as karate, is that BJJ is often argued to be a formless art. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is absent of the katas and standardized grading criteria which are so commonly found in what are known as the traditional martial arts. Instead, BJJ is a martial art open to interpretation; such that new techniques and ways of movement, attack, defense, and thinking are being developed daily by those practicing it. Subsequently, the promotion of athletes/fighters through the ranks is highly subjective and can differ greatly from one academy to another.

BJJ promotes the concept that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend against a bigger, stronger, heavier assailant by using proper technique, leverage, and most notably, taking the fight to the ground, and then applying joint-locks and chokeholds to defeat the opponent. BJJ training can be used for sport grappling tournaments (gi and no-gi) and mixed martial arts (MMA) competition or self-defense. Sparring (commonly referred to as rolling) and live drilling play a major role in training, and a premium is placed on performance, especially in competition, in relation to progress and ascension through its ranking system.  Since its inception in 1882, its parent art of judo was separated from older systems of Japanese Jiu Jitsu by an important difference that was passed on to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: it is not solely a martial art,but it is also a sport; a method for promoting physical fitness and building character in young people; and, ultimately, a way (Do) of life.

  • Caveirinha Jiu-Jitsu Family

  • 1050 Ala Moana Blvd Ste 2400 Honolulu, HI 96814

  • 808-591-0242

  • info@cjjfamily.com